Book Definition: A general ability, proposed by Spearman as the main factor underlying all intelligent mental activity.

History


In the 1920s, intelligence tests became more prevalent. The British psychologist Charles Spearman showed a high correlation between test taker's scores on varied tests. He called this general intelligence and later named it the g factor. John Duncan later on, developed the insight that the frontal lobe could be the center of the g factor.

In Your Own Words


  • A well-rounded person (mentally).

Examples/Functions


  • Someone who is smart and generally knowledgeable in a variety of topics.
  • The IB program would best support the g-factor theory because it requires specific advanced placement classes in 6 areas of generic subjects such as art, music, math, english, history, and science, expecting you to achieve an A.


Additional Resources


  1. http://www.buzzle.com/articles/the-general-intelligence-factor-g.html
  2. http://www.medilexicon.com/medicaldictionary.php?t=31681
  3. http://www.psych.utoronto.ca/users/reingold/courses/intelligence/cache/1198gottfred.html