Definition: Refers to a test's ability to measure what it's supposed to measure.


Quite Simply...

  • An assessment that tests on what it is designed to test.
  • The extent to which a test measures what it claims to measure
  • How well a test measures the behavior for which it was intended

Examples of Validity


Tests with high validity (able to measure what it was designed to measure):
  • A test on trigonometry that contains a lot of questions on trigonometric ratios.
  • A pregnancy test that actually measures if one is pregnant.
  • A chemistry test that is includes stoichiometry.
  • A fitness test that measures physical fitness.
  • A blood test that measures your blood type, glucose levels, cholesterol, etc.
  • An AP psychology test on personality that has questions pertaining to what you learned in the personality chapter

Tests with low validity (unable to measure what it was designed to measure):
  • You take a Psychology test on which all the questions were related to Chemistry.
  • The subject of a test is vegetables yet it has questions about fruit.
  • An English test that tests physical fitness and ability.
  • A U.S. government test which contains mostly questions on the Swedish government.
  • A blood test that measures heart rate.

See Also....


The different types of validity:

  • Criterion Validity is a type of validity that assesses the validity of an experiment by comparing the test's results to a more "objective" results.
  • Content Validity is a type of validity that measures whether or not a test contains the entire range of possible items the test can cover.
  • Face Validity is a type of validity that measures whether or not a test looks like what it's supposed to measure.