Book Definition: A sleep deficiency caused by not getting the amount of sleep that one requires for optimal functioning.


In Your Own Words


  • When you are sleep deprived and your need for sleep builds up and your body tries to get the sleep whenever it can, causing REM rebound and severe drowsiness, as well as inhibiting other normal ways of functioning
  • A condition that most people are unaware that they have because their bodies trick them into believing that they have gotten enough sleep.
  • The lack of sleep which then affects cognitive and motor skills

Examples/Functions

  • When a person stays up late all weekend and the next morning they are tired during school and falling asleep during class due to insufficient sleep over weekend.
  • In the spring, when everyone loses and hour of sleep, it may cause sleepiness and effect our optimal functioning.
  • The EXXON Valdez incident, when investigated, was found to have been caused by a drowsy captain.
  • A college student has stayed up until 3 AM every night studying and doing homework when they have to get up at 7 AM to go to class. The next day, they don't function well and they can hardly pay attention in class.
  • The day after having an all-nighter with your youth group you are drowsy, irritable, and always drifting off into dreamland.
  • Staying up super late every night to finish homework because you had school, practice, then work and didn't get home until 9:30 PM.
  • Going to a football game on a Sunday night and not making it home till 2 am and then having to go to school in the morning will result in you not functioning well.
  • Playing your favorite video game all night and being exhausted the next day.
  • Cramming for an exam the night before, and waking up at 6 a.m. to get ready for school.
  • Causes some people to take afternoon naps
  • Over the course of the week a student may only get 3-4 hours of sleep a night, not getting enough REM sleep as well as the Stage 4 sleep, so over the weekend they sleep for 12-14 hours.

Additional Resources


  1. [http://www.sleepdex.org/deficit.htm