You teenagers are around the age of learning how to drive. Maybe you drive, maybe you don't, maybe you are in driving classes.I just think that it is something that you are thinking about already, so why not try and relate that to psychology. Each of these examples will have to do with driving.

INSTRUCTIONS
  1. After finishing your assigned readings, pick a term/concept that would apply to driving and either complete the partial sentence of "When you are driving..." just like the examples below or edit an existing example to make it make more sense.
  2. ALWAYS USE PSYCHOLOGICAL TERMS FROM PSYCHLOPEDIA IN YOUR EXAMPLES.
  3. Link to the term that you used with the link button. At the end of the year we will take all of these mini examples and construct them into one short story about driving, road-trips or maybe even a high speed chase.
  4. Only use each term once... unless the person who used it before was wrong in the way they used it... in that case, replace it.

Chapter 3: Biopsychology

  • When you're driving, and you get into a car crash, your personal bias might effect the rendition of events you choose to admit to the police officer.
  • When you are driving, and another person suddenly swerves in your direction, your nervous system and its neurons will work together to help you avoid crashing into that person. The nervous system sends a warning or alert to the brain that there is a problem, and that alert is passed down by neurons to the body parts that need to respond (aka the foot on the brake [[#|pedal]] and the hands on the steering wheel) so that you can swerve the car out of the way.
  • When you're driving on a wonderful Friday night a drunk driver comes out of no where and crashes into you. When you wake up you realize that your arm is broken and it is swelling up really fast. This is when your sensory neurons send a message to your brain telling it that your arm is broken and in extreme [[#|pain]].
  • When you are driving and another car is heading for you, your somatic nervous system sends the message to your brain and your skeletal system to swerve out of the way.
  • When you are driving, and you get into a crash, endorphins, which control sensations, would be released to block the pain in order to allow you to get away from the wreckage safely.
  • When you are driving, your motor neurons help tell your brain how to grip the steering wheel and how hard or light to apply your foot to the break and gas.
  • When you are driving, the reticular formation helps you to be alert for things like stop signs, traffic lights, pedestrians, etc.
  • When you're driving drunk, the amount of GABA is decreased which causes your reactions to be greatly slowed down.
  • When you are driving and someone honks at you, the sound will be registered by the auditory cortex in your temporal lobes.
  • When you're driving to a place you've only been to a few times, glutamate will help you remember where it is.
  • When you're driving, if you have an imbalance of norepinephrines, then you could get road rage more easily because you are prone to be more stressed if your [[#|blood pressure]] is higher.
  • When you're driving, your occipital lobes will register what is in front of you through your vision.
  • When you're driving, and suddenly you need to stop, your reflexes will react to make your foot push down on the brake.
  • When you're driving, you need to use your reticular formation to stay alert at all times and you also need to control your pons so that you don't fall asleep while driving.
  • When you're driving, you need your Frontal Lobes to control your thinking and plan out where you are driving to and how you will get there
  • When you're driving, your cerebellum is being used by turning the steering wheel and using blinkers.
  • When you're driving, it is important that your corpus callosum connects both left and right hemispheres of your brain (and you are therefore not a split brain patient) so that they can communicate with one another and you can read signs and be aware of the spatial placement of objects on the road.
  • When you're driving on a road trip, your hypothalamus will alert you when you have to go to the bathroom so you can pull over to a restaurant and go.
  • When you're driving, plasticity allows you to improve your abilities in certain hazardous situations. Meaning that, you will learn from experience and over time evolve into a better driver in hazardous situations.
  • When you're driving, and you fall asleep behind the wheel and wake up your sympathetic nervous system panics and you start to swerve, but moments later your parasympathetic nervous system will calm you down and slow down your heart rate along with your adrenaline.
  • When you're driving, your hypothalamus alerts your brain and body to pull over and get a snack when you're hungry because it regulates your bodys internal state.

Chapter 4: Sensation and Perception

  • When you're driving, having a sensation problem would be especially bad considering colors are pertinent in seeing certain signs and traffic lights. You wouldn't be able to tell if you were suppose to be stopping if light is red or accelerating if light is green. This disability would end up in multiple automobile accidents.
  • When you're driving to the North Pole from Maryland, your pons will let you know when it is time to pull over to get some rest.
  • When you're driving with an imbalance of hormones, your endocrine system would be over stimulated or under stimulated inhibiting or overexciting the nervous system
  • When you're driving, your optical nerve sends a message to your brain to let you know the cars in front of you are slowing down for the stop sign ahead.
  • When you're driving, your rods allow you to see where you're going in the dim light levels,and your rods help you to see the brake lights and the colorful important signs on the road.
  • When you're driving (especially if you only have one eye) the blind spot in your vision could be a horrible, dangerous nuisance.
  • When you're driving, you can only see the visible spectrum of light, but the rest of the electromagnetic spectrum would be invisible. If you could see more of the spectrum, then you might be able to see the signals coming from your car's radio, or the x-rays at the doctor's office.
  • When you're driving, the road can be used as a good metaphor for gate-control theory: there are people who drive fast (fast fibers) and those who don't (slow fibers), and like on any road, sometimes the fast drivers go around or cut off the slow ones in the same way that fast fibers can close the spinal "gate" for slow fibers.
  • When you're driving, in a jeep without a hardtop cover, the noise the air makes when you drive fast is really loud, however, through sensory adaption, about ten minutes of it and it is "tuned out" until you do not notice it anymore.
  • When you're driving, and its night we use lights to locate the position of other things. These artificial lights allow other objects to pass our absolute threshold of sight so we may see them and not run into them.
  • When you're driving, perceptual constancy is incredibly important. Without it, we might recognize a car when it is behind us, but when it passes us, we may have no clue what it is.
  • When you're driving, if a symbol on a construction sign is unclear and misinterpreted, it could be perceived as an ambiguous figure.
  • When you're driving you use top down processing to notice the shape of a pedestrian in front of you before you notice what color shift they are wearing.
  • When you are driving closure helps you identify your side of the road when in a two-way passing zone and the yellow line dividing the lanes is dotted, not filled in.
  • When you're driving, you have to pay attention to both the figure of the road itself as well as the ground of its surroundings to remain safe.
  • When you're driving, a signal detection theory false alarm occurs when you think someone honked at you, but actually nobody did. A stimulus mistakenly crossed your threshold and you responded.
  • When you're driving, it's difficult to say whether we use the top-down or bottom-up theory to the binding problem. That is, do we notice just whole cars and the whole environment around us before noticing details, or are we noticing little details of cars, stop lights, and bumps in the road to make up everything around us?
  • When you're driving, you will need your Binocular Cues to determine how far something is from your car. For example, you might need to know how far away the traffic light is in order to stop on time.
  • When you are driving, having your foot on the gas and humming to the song the radio is playing is an example of your subconscious processes.
  • When you're driving, some stimuli will barely cross your difference threshold when you see something you pass everyday. For example, you wouldn't really notice the trees changing colors outside Arundel when you drive in.
  • When you are driving, perception will let you see the yield sign next to the bush, but someone else might not see it.
  • When you're driving, the law of common fate will let you believe that cars going towards the exit may have a common destination
  • When you are driving, Weber's Law will make it so if you're stuck in traffic with so many other cars, you won't notice if two other cars get added into the traffic.
  • When you are driving, your perceptual set is to see other cars, so you might be unaware of an incoming motorcycle, bicycle, or pedestrians.
  • When you are driving your consciousness may shift from active to daydreaming as you go through the routine task of driving down a road,which is extremely dangerous.
  • When you are driving and you see a tree that looks really small in the distance compared to one right next to you that looks large, that is relative size.
  • When you are driving, you use your fovea and peripheral vision to see your path of travel.
  • When you are driving, if you slightly increase your speed from 65 to 70 it might not pass your difference threshold because it is such a small change.
  • When you are driving, olfaction occurs when your windows are down and the car in front of you makes a sudden stop, causing "rubber to burn". The odor reacts with receptor protient in the nose and the info is then conveyed to brain's olfactory bulbs.
  • When you are driving, the law of of common fate explains how you group cars based on their direction.
  • When you are driving, it is possible that you could miss a sign or something if it is in your blind-spot because of your optic nerve.
  • When you're driving, sensation is seeing the light change to green, perception is realizing that green means you can go.
  • When you're driving, your kinesthetic sense allows you to sense that you are moving in space.
  • When you're driving, the law of similarity groups cars together based on their type, shape, size, color, etc.
  • When you're driving, perception allows you to transduce a sound into a honking car.
  • When you're driving, depth perception allows you to determine how close to/far away from other cars or objects you are.This can help you prevent accidents from occurring.
  • When you're driving, you don't want your fovea focused on something for too long, because it results in highway hypnosis.
  • When you're driving, your perception causes the stop sign to be meaningful, that's why cars come to a stop.
  • When you're driving, (at night) it is important to have functional Rods so you can see where you are driving.
  • When you're driving, being able to see is crucial and the retina is responsible for being the light sensitive layer for you to see.
  • When you're driving, deafness could be dangerous if you can't hear someone honking at you or police cars coming.
  • When you’re driving (in the dark) and you happen to have someone in your trunk the kinesthetic sense would help that person know when the car is moving.
  • When you're driving, your difference threshold can detect when someone turns down the radio.
  • When you're driving, Signal Detection Theory can detect a hit if you think someone honked at you and someone did actually honk at you.
  • When you're driving, you need to be aware that you have a blind spot, where the optic nerve exits the eye and you won't be able to see anything in this area.

Chapter 5: States of Consciousness

  • When you're driving and living with narcolepsy, it is very dangerous because if you were to have a sleep attack behind the wheel; you would be a hazard to yourself and to others.
  • When you're driving, if your circadian rhythmis messed up because you pulled an all-nighter, you will experience symptoms similar to that of being intoxicated.
  • When you're driving, sleep debt (sleep deprivation) will make you automatically less alert and focused then if following a healthy circadian rhythm.
  • When you're driving, you must be sure to have slept enough beforehand, otherwise you may unexpectedly enter REM sleep and end up crashing.
  • When you're driving, some types of meditation could keep you relax under stressful circumstances.
  • When you're driving, your conscious keeps you focused on the traffic in front of you.
  • When your driving, people living with catoplexi could randomly loose control of their body and crash.
  • When you are driving, habituation happens when automatically following a certain order of checking lights, e-brake, mirrors, etc.
  • When you're driving, it is important not to be on conscious altering drugs such as LSD and Marijuana or else you will diverge your attention away from the road
  • When you're driving, you might be a very safety conscious driver but according to Freud it could be you're unconscious controlling you.
  • When you're driving and daydreaming you will most likely crash because you're not focused on the road.
  • When you're driving it wouldn't be safe to take any hallucinogens because then you would be seeing things that aren't really there and crash or put others in danger.
  • When you're driving, your preconscious will remind you to stop when you see a stop sign or red light.

Chapter 6: Learning

  • When you're driving, punishment for speeders will not make everyone, or even the majority of drivers, stop speeding; mainly because only a fraction of speeders are caught.
  • When you're driving, your conditioned response is to stop when you see the light turn red.
  • When you're driving, and you stop at a red light, you realize that you have been going through Classical Conditioning since you were little and now associate a red light for stopping, a yellow for slowing down, and a green for going.
  • When you're driving, you get use to going the speed of everyone else, this is because of habituation, you do not look at the speet limit sign anymore.
  • When you're driving, and you see a cop car you slow down, because Classical Conditioninghas paired cop cars and getting pulled over for speeding together.
  • When you're driving, everytime you get to and from your destination safely, that is an reinforcerthat you are a good driver.
  • When you're driving, the longer you go without getting into an accident, the lower your insurance rate will be. This is an example of positive reinforcement.
  • When you're driving, a type of omission training in regards to promoting safe driving in a teenager might involve taking their phone away while they drive, so as to remove the temptation to text and drive.
  • When you're driving the skills you learned in driving school might undergo a certain amount of extinction, especially if you drive the same route every day, and aren't faced with the choices that you did when you took the license test.
  • When you're driving, cognitive learningensures that one can navigate around a detour to get to the destination quickly, even if the detour was once taken long ago while not being the driver.
  • When you're driving, if you know how to get somewhere because of previous experiences, you are using your cognitive map.
  • When you're driving, you are responsible because if you are not your parents will practice negative punishmentby revoking your car keys.
  • When you're driving, and you are in an unfamilliar area, you lack a cognitive map of the area, and will need a physical map or GPS.
  • When you're driving, negative reinforcement is what causes you to put on your seat belt so the annoying beeping sound goes away.
  • When you're driving, you follow all the laws of the road or else your license could be taken away, which is an example of negative punishment.
  • When you're driving without a map, you use a cognitive map to remember the directions and which roads to take.
  • When you're driving, and you get pulled over for speeding, positive punishment is what keep s you from doing it again.
  • When I'm driving, I glance both ways before crossing a light that just turns green because once I almost got hit by a speeder crossing a red light. This is an example of classical conditioning.
  • When you're driving, observational learning helps you keep up with the traffic, and also be a safe driver.
  • When you're driving, if you speed you will get a ticket, which is an example of positive punishment.
  • when you're driving, and you get a ticket and your mom takes your car could be positive punishment.

Chapter 7: Cognition

  • When you're driving and get rear ended, hitting your head causes retrograde amnesia and you are not able to remember previously stored memories, such as what caused the accident.
  • When you're driving, procedural memory allows one to recall the force of which to push the pedal and the degree to turn the wheel when on a windy road.
  • When you're driving, recalling directions for how to get to a family members house requires declarative memory.
  • When you're driving, the procedural memory allows you to remember how to park a car.
  • When you're driving, somewhere new but you feel like you've been there before and it's vaguely familiar, that is deja vu.
  • When you're driving, and you need to parallel park you must recall the technique you learned back in driving school on how to do so and how to allign it.
  • When you're driving, we use cues (such as road signs and signals) to recall in context the way a road moves, or the way a car is going to act.
  • When you're driving and you do not recognize a place you have been before, you are experiencing jamais vu.
  • When you're driving, retrieval cues such as signs on the road will help you recall which route is the best for reaching your destination.
  • When you're driving, you are using your sensory memory when you are listening to music in the car.
  • When you're driving, proactive memory allows me to drive as my driving teacher instructed me, not in the bad habits I have more recently taught myself.
  • When you're driving, you may forget how to get to one place because the similar, but not identical, directions to a place in the same area keep popping into your head. This is an example of blocking, where you can't recall one memory because a similar one is in the way.
  • When you're driving you might be listening to the radio and a song comes on but you can't think of the name of the song but you know that you know it. This is called TOT phenomenon.
  • When you’re driving, you may experience blocking if your parents are yelling and you don't remember which turn to take.
  • When you're driving in a new city, you may experience proactive interference where you try to find the supermarket based on the memory of your home town.
  • When you're driving, mood-congruent memory suggests that you will recall memories that reflect your mood.
  • When you're driving, if you're trying to remember what you read in a manual years ago, you probably couldn't because of transience.
  • When you're driving and become absent-minded, there's a chance you will not be paying attention to your surroundings because you could possibly be day dreaming and suddenly forget where you are going.
  • When you're driving, you can be engaged in a conversation with someone and forget your directions because you were so focused on the conversation. It blocks your other memory of knowing where you are going.
  • When you're driving, you are trying to recall the address your mother told you on the phone but you were so absent-minded that you forgot it!
  • When you're driving, it would be unfortunate if misattribution occurred and you thought the way to get to your doctor's appointment was actually the way to get to the veterinarian.
  • When you're driving, concept allows one to go at about the posted speed limit with checking their speedometer; they have natural concepts of the speed at which the sign directs them to travel.
  • When you're driving, you could forget how to get around if you haven't been in an area in years. The reason you forget is because of transience.
  • When you're driving, and there is new development at a place you're familiar with, possibly buildings or housing, the new image of this particular place could cause you to not be able to recall what the area looked like before the new development was put up, this is called Blocking.
  • When you’re driving and you hear a catchy song that tune may be stuck in your head and is persistent.
  • When you're driving and you get into an accident, the police may attempt to use the misinformation effect to get you to admit you caused the accident.
  • When you're driving and someone cuts you off you become angry and then start thinking about all of theses angry memories, this is an example of mood-congruent memory.
  • When you're driving and the car in front of you is going very slow, representative bias kicks in to cause you to assume it must be an old person driving that car.
  • When you're driving artificial concepts are the reason you know to stop at a stop sign.
  • When you're driving, your recognition ability affects your sense of direction and how often you get lost.
  • When you're driving, blocking could be used to get past a bad accident you were in so you would be able to get behind the wheel again.
  • When you're driving and you think of many different ways to get to a certain destination based on certain past experiences or inferences you can make it is using Heuristics to problem solve. For example, If you wanted to get to Annapolis from Arundel and knew you could either go from 32 to 97 to 50 to get there or you could go from 3 to 424 to 450 to get there, or even if you knew a different back road to get there that was even less time consuming. If you thought that 32 was the only way to get to Annapolis you would be experiencing functional fixedness.
  • When you're driving, absent-mindedness would cause you to take the wrong exit because you zoned out when you should have turned.
  • When you're driving, and you're prone to suggestibility, someone could convince you to take a different turn than the one you were going to take and it could be the wrong turn.
  • When you're driving and you run into really bad traffic, hindsight bias might make you say "I knew that I shouldn't have taken this exit!"
  • When you're driving and you're car breaks down a mental set could limit you in trying to figure out what is wrong with the car. For instance, you could get hooked on the idea that it's the battery that's the problem because it's ALWAYS the battery, but later you find out it was something totally different.
  • When you're driving, it is more than possible that if you are cut off by a blonde, you will experience representative bias the next time you see a blonde, and assume they are going to cut you off.
  • When you're driving, an algorithm will not suffice when there are detours.
  • When you're driving, you can use Chunking to memorize the number for luna when you hear it on the radio.
  • When you're driving, you have experienced sensory memory when you pass a skunk and it smells.

Chapter 8: Emotion and Motivation

  • When you're driving, if you have a low level of emotional intelligence, you may be more prone to drastic amounts of road rage or you wouldnt be able to deal with any type of stress or unexcpected incident on the road.
  • When you're driving, lateralization of emotion dictates that the right hemisphere is likely more active because driving is typically stressfuul and aggravating.
  • When driving, and another car cuts you off your physiological arousal will spike from fear of hitting the other car.
  • When driving, sensation seekers may go too fast just to experience the high level of stimulation.
  • When you're driving it would be a good idea to keep your emotions, such as anger like when someone. cuts you off, controlled, because aggression is never a good idea.
  • When you're driving and you see a deer in the road or a car coming towards you, you would feel fear. According to opponent-process theory, calmness would be supressed.
  • When you're driving, you might start to play with your hair but you don't know why. This could be a symptom of an Unconscious motivation towards something.
  • when you're driving it is very important to stay concious while on the road so that you stay aware and avoid any crashes or accidents that could occur.
  • When you're driving, slow traffic would be a possible stressor that would affect your driving ability.
  • When you're driving, you uses approach-approach theory by deciding whether to go to McDonalds or Burger King
  • When you're driving, Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) could occur from past car accident a driver has had.
  • When you're driving, you face an avoidance-avoidance conflict when one route you take to work has tons of traffic and the other route to work has tons of traffic lights.
  • When you're driving, the amount you need esteem, self-actualization, and attachment and affiliation, might suddenly drop if your safety is compromised in a close-call traffic incident (this is based on Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs).
  • When you're driving and a you get in an accident, you go through the stages of the General Adaptation Syndrome. Initially, you are in the state of alarm, with your heart thumping and your brow sweating from the fear and action of the crash. Later on, you reach the resistance or adaptation stage once you've gotten out of the car, started to calm down, and assessed the damages and everyone's well-being. Lastly, you reach exhaustion once you've gotten home and everything is finally taken care of.
  • When you're driving you may come up to an approach-approach situation. You see two cars that both look great on the exterior and interior but also have great engines as well. You're conflicted as to which one to choose because there are no negatives about the cars.
  • When you're driving, you may have the choice to take 2 exits, both which will bring you into 2 bad parts of town, this is an avoidance-avoidance conflict
  • When driving, cognitive appraisal theory suggests that a driver when cut off will be physiologically aroused and will assess the situation and freak out at the driver who cut him/her off.
  • When driving, you could learn learned helplessness if you continuously tried getting into the lane beside you, but the other driver wouldn't let you over.
  • When driving, if someone were to make a mistake, the display rule in America would be surrounding drivers would be angry, as to other countries drivers may be more calm.
  • When driving, you almost always face an avoidance-avoidance conflict because you will be trying to reach your destination but no matter what route you take there will be a lot of traffic.
  • When your driving, people who have an external Locus of Control could experience internal Locus of Control since they're the only person making the decisons on where to go and are able to drive the car their way.
  • When you're driving, implicit memory is impossible because you were taught all of that.
  • When you're driving, the road rage drivers most likely are Type A, while you, who just lets them be, are most likely Type B.
  • When you're driving, you may enter the stage of resistance because driving takes your mind away from stress.

Chapter 9: Psychological Development

  • When you're letting a young child drive, they may exhibit centration by having their attention be focused on the new car beside them instead of all of the traffic surrounding them.
  • When teens are driving, they sometimes display animistic thinking by naming their cars and giving them personalities.
  • When you're driving, it's best to avoid cutting off drivers who may have short, angry temperaments so that they don't retaliate.
  • When you're driving, and a person runs a red light, they are stuck in Kohlberg's first stage of moral development because they risk other people's well being and life for just getting to a location only a minute less than they would've originally arrived.
  • When you're driving, a child may exhibit their lack of conservation by thinking that the bigger car is going faster than the smaller cars, when they're actually all going the same speed.
  • When you're driving, a child may show theory of mind by seeing a car go under a bridge and believe that the car is gone forever.
  • When you're driving, a child may demonstrate centration by staring at the raindrops on their window and only that.
  • When you're driving, your child may be throwing things from the back seat and distracting you as you drive, even though you tell he or she to stop, because you show a permissive style of parenting.

Chapter 10: Personality

  • When you're driving, you may choose to listen to your superego, as it tells you slow down, and ignore your id that tells you to speed up because you're the only one on the road and you've done the same thing before.
  • When you're driving, you may use rationalization to reason with yourself about texting while driving, and come to the conclusion that it makes your driving dangerous and is therefore the wrong choice to make.
  • When you're driving, you may experience basic anxiety, the paranoia of which might cause you to constantly check your dashboard for warning lights and the proper turn signals, or that your brights are not turned on.
  • When you're driving, you may use denial to claim that the accident was not your fault.
  • When you're driving, you will most likely have an external locus of control, and blame the other drivers for poor driving.
  • When you're driving and you succumb to frequent road rage, you might take up kickboxing as a way to employ sublimation.
  • If you are a bad driver, you may use projection to say that the person in front of you who merged at the last minute is a TERRIBLE driver.
  • When you're driving and some idiot cuts you off, your id and Thanatos will tell you to run the guy off the road, but your ego keeps you from doing it because your ego keeps the balance between the desires of your id and your superego.
  • When you're driving, you may commit the fundamental attribution error if you see someone else in an accident and assume that they are a bad driver but in reality, the other person may in the accident may have been drunk.
  • When you're drving you're you are always on edge and ready to press the breaks because you were in a bad accident before and your psychic determinism is causing your action of pressing the break.

Chapter 11: Testing and Intelligence


  • `When you're driving, the use of practical intelligence is necessary because you become a better driver with the more experience you have meaning you become a better driver through what you learn in your everyday driving experience and environment.
  • When you're driving, you will need both Fluid Intelligence and Crystallized intelligence. To establish a knowledge of cause and affect you will need to have Fluid intelligence, by knowing the cause and affect of what you are doing while driving you are less likely to get into an accident. Crystallized intelligence helps you store basic knowledge, this will help you remember what turns you take to get to your destination.
  • When you're driving, you should use the test-retest reliability when making a left turn onto a road because testing or looking both ways more than once and getting the same result that no one is coming is a good strategy to use to make a safe left turn. This test makes your decision to turn even more valid since you checked both ways more than once and saw that no one was coming each time.
  • When you're driving, it's important to have spatial intelligence (one of Gardner's multiple type of intelligence), without it you wouldn't be able to get to where you need to go, because it's the ability to picture mentally the objects and interact with them in the space around you.
  • When you're driving, if your parents expected you to be a bad driver so they rarely let you drive, then when you do, you are a bad driver, then this is an example of self-fulfilling prophecy.because you also assumed you were a bad driver and did not try to get better.
  • When your driving, you might exhibit self-fulfilling prophecy by expecting to get into an accident because your freinds told you that you would, and then actually getting into one. but knowing that you were going to crash you quickly release your seatbelt and jump out of the car before it explodes. This is an example of practical intelligence.
  • When you're driving, and you are taking your liscense test for the 8th time and you fail again, the test has high reliability. This is because no matter how many times you take the test, you get the same results- there is no beating the system..... and you really suck at driving.

Chapter 12: Abnormal Psychology

  • When you’re driving, and you feel yourself freeze and fear take over for no reason at all than you may have a Panic disorder. Because it would be totally random and you should not feel any anxiety before or after the attack.
  • When you're driving, and you happen to have dissociative identity disorder , at one moment your more sensible personality may be making you drive safely, and at the required speed. Then at any unpredictable moment, your more aggressive personality could cause you to give every other driver "the bird" while driving 20 mph over the speed limit- violently protesting law enforcement.
  • When you are driving, it is dangerous to experience a hallucination because this can make you have false perceptions with your senses that appear to be real to you. For example, you could be watching the road and suddenly the road starts shattering and caving in when it actually isn't.
  • When you are driving, if you have OCD, you may feel as though you have to check over your shoulder an abnormal amount of times before switching lanes because of your disorder causing you to have recurrent and persistent thoughts and feelings and do repetitive behaviors.
  • When you're driving, if you have a specific phobia of highways, the best therapy would to utilize exposure therapy to easy your fears of faster road ways and traffic by driving on slower road ways.
  • If you have antisocial personality disorder, when you're driving, its possible that you would run over somebody and keep on driving, since you will have no guilt or remorse for such actions.

Chapter 14: Social Psychology

  • When you're driving, and you see a car crash you should not commit a diffusion of responsibility . If you see a car accident and dont call the police because you think "of course someone else will call, I dont need to" you are committing a diffusion of responsibility. If this happens someone may never call 911 and the person inside the wrecked car may never get help.
  • When you're driving, you would exert self-serving bias by denying your fault in causing an accident but taking credit for passing your license test on the first try. This is because you want to take credit for your success but deny responsibilities of failure.
  • when you are driving and see that a car is pulled over on the side of the road and their having car troubles and you just go right by them and say someone else will help him. That is Diffusion of Responsibility.
  • When you are driving, you understand how people are supposed to perform, pedestrians on cross walks, right turn on red etc, through social scripts that you have developed about driving.
  • When you are driving, and you see everybody driving through red lights and stopping at green ones, conformity would make you do the same as everyone else. This is because we dont like to feel like the odd one out, as shown in the Asch experiments.
  • When you are driving you could commit the fundemental attribution error by saying someone is a wreckless driver, when in reality it's a man rushing his wife to a hospital because she is in labor.
  • When you are driving you could commit the action of scapegoating by blaming an accident that you committed on the innocent man waving in an elmo suit. You blamed the accident on the man who had no influence on your driving ability.