Book Definition:

A psychotic disorder involving distortions in thoughts, perceptions and/or emotions.

History


Paul Eugen Bleuler was the first to coin the term Schizophrenia.
Bleuler.png

It is still unclear on what exactly causes Schizophrenia, but experts believe genetics and the environment are both clear suspects. However the disease was first identified as a discrete mental illness by Dr. Emile Kraepelin in the 1887 and the illness itself is generally believed to have accompanied mankind through its history.

In Your Own Words


  • A disorder that has a loss of personality recognition, changes in perception in thought, or even a distored idea of reality typically causing a "split or broken mind".
  • Confusion of multiple realities layered with hallucinations and delusions.

Examples/Functions


  • Language is greatly altered in a schizophrenic person, and this confusion causes the conversation to produce rhyming words, and irrelevant sentences like "clang bang dang hang lang thang yang pang rang tang gang fang".
  • A father hallucinating, hearing his kids crying from inside the burning fireplace, and burning his hands as he digs through the flames to "save them".
  • A schizophrenic person might say something like:
"The lion will have to change from dogs to cats until I can meet my father and mother and we disport some rats. I live on the front of Whitton's head. You have to work hard if you don't get into bed... it's all over for a squab true tray, and there ain't no squabs, there ain't no men, there ain't no music, there ain't no nothing besides my mother and my father who stand alone upon the island of Capri where is no ice. Well it's my suitcase sir." (Rogers, 1982)
  • The girl in the Roommate was schizophrenic. In example, she believed she was the main character's sister and thought everyone was trying to hurt her.

Additional Resources



  1. http://www.nami.org/Template.cfm?Section=By_Illness&template=/ContentManagement/ContentDisplay.cfm&ContentID=741
  2. schizophrenia information
  3. http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/schizophrenia/index.shtml
  4. http://www.medicinenet.com/schizophrenia/article.htm
  5. http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/epigen/szwhatis.htm